A Modernization Strategy for Legacy Applications: Background and Business Case for Incremental Change (Part 1)

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A Modernization Strategy for Legacy Applications: Background and Business Case for Incremental Change (Part 1)

Organizations have implemented an evolving suite of Microsoft-based software technologies for many business-critical functions. A number of these applications have proven to be quite effective for the intended business use cases.

 

Many application systems have enjoyed a very long life, have been successfully upgraded and refactored numerous times to remain supported, are free of user licensing costs, are widely adopted and are very familiar to their respective user communities. These applications include a significant proportion of newer components, based on more up-to-date Microsoft .NET tools, as well as some older components, based on the old code libraries, which have long passed normal expected lifespans as an enterprise business software platform.

 

This legacy technology aging process creates significant obsolescence and security concerns for management. Moving forward, a functionality-comparable solution, built using modern software tools, has strong potential to create opportunity for greater efficiency, while improving user experiences and business outcomes.

 

To learn more, download Part 1 of the White Paper - A Modernization Strategy for Legacy Applications: Background and Business Case for Incremental Change.

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